23 7 / 2014

Strengthening National Implementation of HIV and TB programs in Juba South Sudan

10 7 / 2014

Zambia

Over the last decade, Zambia has made remarkable progress in the fight against HIV, TB and malaria, with the support of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria and other major donors. The country has strengthened its health systems and access to care and treatment has been provided to many Zambians. By the end of 2013, more than 580,000 people of which 49,419 are children had access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), with the result that HIV incidence has fallen 25 per cent and AIDS deaths have fallen by more than half. Zambia has achieved universal coverage of TB-DOTS and the MDG target of halting and beginning to reverse the TB epidemic by 2015. The TB case detection rate is above 80 per cent and nearly 90 per cent of the 30,000 TB cases in Zambia in 2012 were successfully treated. Access to malaria prevention and treatment is expanding, and an ambitious mass distribution of bed nets is underway nationwide in 2014.

The country’s progress is all the more remarkable for having been achieved in the face of chronic capacity constraints, in health infrastructure, governance, financial management, procurement and monitoring and evaluation. This case study examines the response to the three diseases in Zambia from the time the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) assumed the role of interim Principal Recipient (PR) of Global Fund grants in 2010, and focuses on the major effort undertaken over two years to strengthen national capacity in key functional areas so that the Zambian Ministry of Health may eventually reassume the PR role, subject to an assessment and decision by the Global Fund on the transition of the PR. The key findings of the case study include:

  • UNDP has played an important role in ensuring continuity of the funding and commodities for the national HIV, TB and malaria programs in Zambia, raising additional resources and managing Global Fund grants effectively;
  • At the same time as managing Global Fund grants, between 2011 and 2013 UNDP has rolled out an ambitious and well-formulated capacity development and transition plan focused on strengthening the Ministry of Health and other national institutions, made possible by, alignment with grant cycles, flexibility and reprogramming;

http://www.undp-globalfund-capacitydevelopment.org/media/469168/zambia_moh_undp_global_fund_case_study_report_23_6_2014_final.pdf 

Key achievements of the capacity development effort include:

  • The establishment of a skilled Program Management Unit in the Ministry of Health to more effectively manage and coordinate donor resources;
  • Major upgrades of the National Health Information System;
  • Development and implementation of standard operating procedures for financial management and procurement of health commodities;
  • Implementation of a new technological platform for improved financial management in the health sector;
  • Significant investments in training at national, provincial and district levels; and
  • Strengthening of the Country Coordination Mechanism.

Success Factors

Ingredients for success in the rollout of the capacity development and transition plan include:

  1. Strong national political commitment, and high-level support from the Global Fund, UNDP and other partners;
  2. Close and effective collaboration involving UNDP and the Ministry of Health working as a joint team, including the embedding of UNDP staff in the Ministry;
  3. Reprogramming and negotiated reallocation of resources for the plan from existing Global Fund grants;

The plan complemented other efforts to strengthen government systems including the MOH / donor Governance and Management Capacity Strengthening Plan (2011). The capacity development plan was firmly grounded in strengthening national institutions and systems, rather than creating parallel systems.

Going Forward

The capacity development process has contributed to the Ministry of Health of Zambia becoming increasingly well positioned to reassume the role of Principal Recipient of Global Fund grants under the Global Fund’s new funding model, subject to an assessment and decision by the Global Fund;

Drawing upon the lessons in Zambia, other countries should consider including capacity development activities in funding applications to the Global Fund under the new funding model;

 The ongoing investment in strengthening the national entities, systems and human resources increases the longer term sustainability and will help ensure services and essential medicines continue to be provided to vulnerable groups in the future. A priority area is the new responsibilities between the MoH and the MCDMCH.

30 6 / 2014

Warehouse Manager la Centrale d’Achat des Médicaments et Matériels Essentiels (CAMME) Djibouti preparing to dispatch anti malaria medicines

25 6 / 2014

We are happy to launch the new how to guides section on our online Capacity Development toolkit for Global Fund grant implementation. 

The How to guides are practical guidance documents that supplement the capacity development guidance on this website. Therefore, the guides are more focused on how to carry out a particular function and less on how to develop the capacities to do so. 

The first guide is on Financial Management of Global Fund grants, and we will be adding more guides in the future. 

Like the rest of the website the guides are responsive and can be used on smartphones and tablets. 

16 6 / 2014

Over the last decade, Zambia made remarkable progress in the fight against HIV, TB and malaria with the support of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria and other major donors. By the end of 2013, more than 580,000 people of which 49,419 are children had access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), with the effect that, HIV incidence fell 25 per cent and AIDS deaths decreased by more than half.

The TB case detection rate is above 80 per cent and nearly 90 per cent of TB cases in 2012 were treated successfully. Access to malaria prevention and treatment is expanding. In the face of capacity constraints in health infrastructure, governance, financial management, procurement and monitoring and evaluation, the country’s progress is all the more remarkable.

This case study examines the period when UNDP assumed the role of interim Principal Recipient (PR) of Global Fund grants in 2010. It focuses on the joint effort by the Global Fund, UNDP and partners to strengthen national capacity so that the Zambian Ministry of Health may ultimately reassume the PR role following an assessment by the Global Fund. Ingredients for success in the rollout of the capacity development (CD) plan include:

  • Strong national political commitment and high-level support from the Global Fund, UNDP and other partners;
  • Close and effective collaboration between UNDP and the Ministry of Health, including the embedding of UNDP staff in the Ministry;
  • Collaboration with the Global Fund to enable the alignment of CD with grant cycles and flexible reprogramming. The reallocation of resources from existing Global Fund grants for the CD plan;
  • The capacity development plan was firmly grounded in strengthening national institutions and systems, rather than      creating parallel systems. The plan complemented other efforts to  strengthen government systems including the MOH / donor Governance and Management Capacity Strengthening Plan (2011).

To read the case study please click the following link;

http://www.undp-globalfund-capacitydevelopment.org/media/471311/final_zambia_global_fund_case_study_16-06-2014_final.pdf

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16 6 / 2014

We’ve just launched a country impact feature on our online toolkit for capacity development! The country impact pages provides at-a-glance information about the key results and achievements in the countries where UNDP is interim principal recipient for Global Fund grants. 

In addition, the country impact pages provide a quick summary of the most important grant information along with a short narrative. The country pages can be downloaded as pdf files for easy distribution or printing. 

Click here to see the country impact pages

13 6 / 2014

Recently, we were fortunate enough to get to visit Tajikistan and learn about the support UNDP and the Global Fund are providing to the Government of Tajikistan. 

12 6 / 2014

'Two days ahead of the FIFA World Cup in Brazil, football star and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Goodwill Ambassador Didier Drogba launches an animated video that tells the story of his early life in a malaria-endemic country and calls attention to a disease that continues to take a child life every minute.

While global malaria mortality rates have been slashed by more than 40% since the year 2000, the disease still claims more than half a million lives every year, mostly among pregnant women and young children, living in sub-Saharan Africa.’

Read more here

11 6 / 2014

Global Accelerator - Entrepreneurs at the UN finding #GlobalSolutions unfoundation

09 6 / 2014

South Sudan became the youngest country in the world on July 2011 when it became independent. The Global Fund and UNDP are working in partnership with the Ministry of Health and other partners to combat HIV and TB.

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View towards Juba capital of South Sudan.

The achievements of this partnership include;

Maternal and Child Health

ü  Helping to prevent the transmission of HIV from mothers to their babies by allowing 1500 HIV positive pregnant women to access anti-retroviral therapy (ART).

Improving Health Outcomes

ü  The joint HIV/TB programme, supported by UNDP and the Global Fund since 2006, facilitated a significant rise in the number of TB patients offered HIV diagnostic counselling and testing from 1 to 12,900 between 2005 and 2012, and allowed for 1,500 co-infected patients to receive ART in 2012 alone.

Developing National Capacity

ü  Supported health care system strengthening and the development of a much needed health workforce through the training of close to 50,000 health service providers.

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Picking list for medicines and comodities 

Despite this progress, TB is among the major causes of morbidity and mortality in South Sudan. The prevalence of HIV among TB patients has reached epidemic proportions (15%, in the 2011 TB/HIV survey report) and coverage of TB services in the country is still low. The insecurity over the last 6 months has had an impact on up to one third of the health facilities.

Supply Chain Management;

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Supply Chain IT Communications and Server

The supply chain management is a vital function ensuring essential commodities and medicines are accessible by people living with HIV and TB and other Key Affected Populations. The main supply chain achievement include; i) Quantification and forecasting of medicines and medical supplies; ii) Warehousing, receiving and storage function; iii) Distribution to ART/TB programs implementing facilities; and iv) Logistic Management Information System (ILMIS) to track medicines and medical supplies.

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Warehouse office Juba

The future challenges include improve warehouse facilities, further integration of supply chains, work to reduce the cost of distribution to the States and the health facilities.

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Juba HIV & TB Warehouse supported by the Global Fund and UNDP.

For more information on strengthening the Supply Chain Management http://www.undp-globalfund-capacitydevelopment.org/home/cd-toolkit-for-hivaids,-tb-malaria-responses.aspx