18 9 / 2014

Country Impact Pages

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Check out the HIV, TB and Malaria results in over 20 countries in the country impact feature. The country impact pages provides at-a-glance information about the key results and achievements in the countries where UNDP is interim principal recipient for Global Fund grants. 

In addition, the country impact pages provide a quick summary of the most important grant information along with a short narrative. The country pages can be downloaded as pdf files for easy distribution or printing. 

Click here to see the country impact pages

23 8 / 2014

Key Affected Populations (KAPs)

New support from the UNDP Global Innovation Facility for “Results communication for Key Affected Populations” will commence implementation in September.  

Barriers to accessing services, including life-saving medicines, remain a significant challenge for Key Affected Populations (KAPs), who include those communities such as sex workers, people who inject drugs and men who have sex with men, who are most likely to be living with HIV. KAPs also include women and children in sub-Saharan Africa who are disproportionately affected by HIV and TB due to stigma and discrimination, compared with the general population.  In order to create greater demand for and access to services for KAPs, the initiative will use communication platforms and social media tools to communicate services and results to KAPs in sub-Saharan Africa and urban areas in LDCs in Asia, and provide them with the opportunity to monitor and evaluate performance of national HIV and TB programs funded by the Global Fund. This will require that relatively high-risk and innovative approaches are adapted to address the challenges.

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Network supporting People Living With HIV

UNDP Innovation Facility

The UNDP Innovation Facility supports initiatives that:

  • enable national development actors to co-create value
  • increase the understanding of the role and value of innovation for development
  • support social innovators both within the organization and from the broader development community

Communicating Results

The innovative approach to enhance communicating results for KAPs has the following broad deliverables;

  • The innovative communication of results to      Key Affected Populations designed and prototyped, with a focus on      Sub-Saharan Africa and urban areas in least developed countries (LDCs) in      Asia.  KAPs monitor and provide feedbacks on the results which is      used to inform and help mobilize KAPs and to raise awareness of the role      and value of innovation;
  • The innovative communication of the UNDP /      Global Fund Portfolio of results designed and monitored, by enabling end      users to monitor and provide feedback on the communication of results and reach      out to those who have not traditionally been involved in the development process;

By tapping communication platforms, social media and mobile technologies, the initiative will directly involve KAPs, who are the hardest to reach, by engaging them as end-users in design and prototyping of communications as well as in the monitoring and evaluating of the activities. The resulting products and emerging lessons will be fed back into the results reporting platforms and social media.  It will also raise awareness of the role and value of innovation.

http://www.undp-globalfund-capacitydevelopment.org/ 

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Discussing Community Needs

06 8 / 2014

Rates of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender people in many countries across South Asia are significantly higher than those in all other adult groups. The Commission on AIDS in Asia (2008) estimates that MSM and transgender populations could account for greater than 50 percent of all new HIV infections
in the Asia-Pacific region by 2020. 

A critical contributing factor for this is that MSM and transgender people experience significant barriers to quality health care due to widespread stigma against same-sex sexual behavior and ignorance about gender variance in mainstream society and within health systems.

To address these critical issues and reduce the impact of and vulnerability to HIV of MSM and transgender people, the Multi-Country South Asia (MSA) Global Fund HIV Programme was formed, funded through the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Operating in eight countries in South Asia (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka), the overall goal of the programme is to reduce the impact of, and vulnerability to, HIV of men who have sex with men, hijras and transgender people through Community Systems Strengthening(CSS).

The programme supports building the capacity of in-country and regional community-based Sub-Recipient organizations engaged in service provision (HIV prevention, care and support services), policy development and advocacy, partnership building with local governments and health departments, research related to MSM and transgender issues, and on creating stronger community systems to support and sustain this work.

The programme is currently in Phase 2 (MSA-910-G02-H), which will run from July 2013 to December 2015. The United Nations Development Programme Asia-Pacific Regional Centre serves as interim Principal Recipient of this grant. 

 

For more information:

Programme webpage: http://asia-pacific.undp.org/content/rbap/en/home/operations/projects/overview/multi-country-south-asia-global-fund-hiv-programme/

Fast Facts: http://asia-pacific.undp.org/content/rbap/en/home/library/hiv_aids/fast-facts—multi-country-south-asia-global-fund-hiv-programme 

Sub-Recipient Profiles: http://asia-pacific.undp.org/content/dam/rbap/docs/hhd/rbap-hhd-2014-sr-profiles.pdf 

Collection of knowledge products published by the MSA Global Fund HIV Programme: http://issuu.com/undpasiapacific/stacks/3cf6eab90e614ef298f37e4b405caabb 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/msagfhivprogramme 

Twitter: https://twitter.com/msagfhivprgm 

04 8 / 2014

Capacity Development for National Entities; 

UNDP’s Global Fund partnership functions as interim Principal Recipient (PR) for Global Fund grants in more than 20 countries.  Part of UNDP’s responsibility is developing national capacities with the aim of transitioning the PR role to a national governmental and/or non-governmental partner.

 The idea of transition is to strengthen national ownership and long-term sustainability by focusing on the ability of national partners to develop and implement programmes and projects in the health sector. The capacity development process supports transition by helping to manage the risks of transferring responsibility, while working to strengthen the requisite systems, processes and skills.

Data quality, reporting and management in Belize

 Capacity Development Process;

UNDP and its country offices supports this capacity development process through engagement of partners, by assessing current capacities assets and needs, and by supporting planning and prioritization of capacity development actions and milestones. This is done whilst simultaneously implementing the programme activities that ensure delivery of life-saving services to those affected by HIV, TB and malaria.

 Part of the process of strengthening national capacities is learning and sharing the lessons learned, within each grant or programme, but  also across programmes, countries or regions. During the last six months UNDP’s Global Fund partnership has increasingly emphasized the sharing of results, experiences and lessons learned. This increased attention has resulted in the following case studies:

 

Systems and procedures manage supply chain management in Zambia

The case studies all include a series of lessons learned. Capacity development is an ongoing process and there are always further challenges which are summarized below:

  •  Investments in skills and infrastructure should be leveraged towards institutional strengthening by linking investments and training to larger organizational goals and treating them as means rather than ends in themselves;
  • Systems and processes for communication and rapid feedback loops play a crucial role in programme implementation and their importance cannot be underestimated;
  • Often, under Global Fund grants civil society organizations (CSOs) will be the important entities that can go the ‘last mile’ and reach key populations. Fostering partnerships with both governmental and non-governmental partners can therefore be the key to successful service delivery and an integral a part of the national capacity;
  • UNDP as interim PR should work closely with Sub-Recipients and national partners in response to the three diseases. Joint planning and implementation will help a smoother transition to a national partner;
  • Successful capacity development requires dedicated monetary and staffing resources and should be integrated in the programmes as early as possible. Thinking towards increased national capacity from the beginning will ultimately contribute to the sustainability and reduce risks of the national responses.

 You can read more about our work on capacity development under Global Fund grants here.

National Malaria Programme in Zimbabwe.

23 7 / 2014

Strengthening National Implementation of HIV and TB programs in Juba South Sudan

10 7 / 2014

Zambia

Over the last decade, Zambia has made remarkable progress in the fight against HIV, TB and malaria, with the support of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria and other major donors. The country has strengthened its health systems and access to care and treatment has been provided to many Zambians. By the end of 2013, more than 580,000 people of which 49,419 are children had access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), with the result that HIV incidence has fallen 25 per cent and AIDS deaths have fallen by more than half. Zambia has achieved universal coverage of TB-DOTS and the MDG target of halting and beginning to reverse the TB epidemic by 2015. The TB case detection rate is above 80 per cent and nearly 90 per cent of the 30,000 TB cases in Zambia in 2012 were successfully treated. Access to malaria prevention and treatment is expanding, and an ambitious mass distribution of bed nets is underway nationwide in 2014.

The country’s progress is all the more remarkable for having been achieved in the face of chronic capacity constraints, in health infrastructure, governance, financial management, procurement and monitoring and evaluation. This case study examines the response to the three diseases in Zambia from the time the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) assumed the role of interim Principal Recipient (PR) of Global Fund grants in 2010, and focuses on the major effort undertaken over two years to strengthen national capacity in key functional areas so that the Zambian Ministry of Health may eventually reassume the PR role, subject to an assessment and decision by the Global Fund on the transition of the PR. The key findings of the case study include:

  • UNDP has played an important role in ensuring continuity of the funding and commodities for the national HIV, TB and malaria programs in Zambia, raising additional resources and managing Global Fund grants effectively;
  • At the same time as managing Global Fund grants, between 2011 and 2013 UNDP has rolled out an ambitious and well-formulated capacity development and transition plan focused on strengthening the Ministry of Health and other national institutions, made possible by, alignment with grant cycles, flexibility and reprogramming;

http://www.undp-globalfund-capacitydevelopment.org/media/469168/zambia_moh_undp_global_fund_case_study_report_23_6_2014_final.pdf 

Key achievements of the capacity development effort include:

  • The establishment of a skilled Program Management Unit in the Ministry of Health to more effectively manage and coordinate donor resources;
  • Major upgrades of the National Health Information System;
  • Development and implementation of standard operating procedures for financial management and procurement of health commodities;
  • Implementation of a new technological platform for improved financial management in the health sector;
  • Significant investments in training at national, provincial and district levels; and
  • Strengthening of the Country Coordination Mechanism.

Success Factors

Ingredients for success in the rollout of the capacity development and transition plan include:

  1. Strong national political commitment, and high-level support from the Global Fund, UNDP and other partners;
  2. Close and effective collaboration involving UNDP and the Ministry of Health working as a joint team, including the embedding of UNDP staff in the Ministry;
  3. Reprogramming and negotiated reallocation of resources for the plan from existing Global Fund grants;

The plan complemented other efforts to strengthen government systems including the MOH / donor Governance and Management Capacity Strengthening Plan (2011). The capacity development plan was firmly grounded in strengthening national institutions and systems, rather than creating parallel systems.

Going Forward

The capacity development process has contributed to the Ministry of Health of Zambia becoming increasingly well positioned to reassume the role of Principal Recipient of Global Fund grants under the Global Fund’s new funding model, subject to an assessment and decision by the Global Fund;

Drawing upon the lessons in Zambia, other countries should consider including capacity development activities in funding applications to the Global Fund under the new funding model;

 The ongoing investment in strengthening the national entities, systems and human resources increases the longer term sustainability and will help ensure services and essential medicines continue to be provided to vulnerable groups in the future. A priority area is the new responsibilities between the MoH and the MCDMCH.

30 6 / 2014

Warehouse Manager la Centrale d’Achat des Médicaments et Matériels Essentiels (CAMME) Djibouti preparing to dispatch anti malaria medicines

25 6 / 2014

We are happy to launch the new how to guides section on our online Capacity Development toolkit for Global Fund grant implementation. 

The How to guides are practical guidance documents that supplement the capacity development guidance on this website. Therefore, the guides are more focused on how to carry out a particular function and less on how to develop the capacities to do so. 

The first guide is on Financial Management of Global Fund grants, and we will be adding more guides in the future. 

Like the rest of the website the guides are responsive and can be used on smartphones and tablets. 

16 6 / 2014

Over the last decade, Zambia made remarkable progress in the fight against HIV, TB and malaria with the support of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria and other major donors. By the end of 2013, more than 580,000 people of which 49,419 are children had access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), with the effect that, HIV incidence fell 25 per cent and AIDS deaths decreased by more than half.

The TB case detection rate is above 80 per cent and nearly 90 per cent of TB cases in 2012 were treated successfully. Access to malaria prevention and treatment is expanding. In the face of capacity constraints in health infrastructure, governance, financial management, procurement and monitoring and evaluation, the country’s progress is all the more remarkable.

This case study examines the period when UNDP assumed the role of interim Principal Recipient (PR) of Global Fund grants in 2010. It focuses on the joint effort by the Global Fund, UNDP and partners to strengthen national capacity so that the Zambian Ministry of Health may ultimately reassume the PR role following an assessment by the Global Fund. Ingredients for success in the rollout of the capacity development (CD) plan include:

  • Strong national political commitment and high-level support from the Global Fund, UNDP and other partners;
  • Close and effective collaboration between UNDP and the Ministry of Health, including the embedding of UNDP staff in the Ministry;
  • Collaboration with the Global Fund to enable the alignment of CD with grant cycles and flexible reprogramming. The reallocation of resources from existing Global Fund grants for the CD plan;
  • The capacity development plan was firmly grounded in strengthening national institutions and systems, rather than      creating parallel systems. The plan complemented other efforts to  strengthen government systems including the MOH / donor Governance and Management Capacity Strengthening Plan (2011).

To read the case study please click the following link;

http://www.undp-globalfund-capacitydevelopment.org/media/471311/final_zambia_global_fund_case_study_16-06-2014_final.pdf

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16 6 / 2014

We’ve just launched a country impact feature on our online toolkit for capacity development! The country impact pages provides at-a-glance information about the key results and achievements in the countries where UNDP is interim principal recipient for Global Fund grants. 

In addition, the country impact pages provide a quick summary of the most important grant information along with a short narrative. The country pages can be downloaded as pdf files for easy distribution or printing. 

Click here to see the country impact pages